Cancer Does Not Care About Age: Kristy Davis

Breast Cancer Survivor, Kristy Davis, shares her best advice for young women.

Kristy Davis is 35 years old from Schaumburg, IL. One month after her 30th birthday, she was diagnosed with ER/PR+ Her-2+ breast cancer. Kristy tested negative for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations and is currently awaiting the results of additional gene testing considering her strong family history of the disease.

Married for eight years, Kristy is a mom to a one year old son and is currently expecting a daughter in late October 2014.

NAME

Kristy Davis

HOW LONG HAS IT BEEN SINCE YOU WERE DIAGNOSED?

I am currently five years cancer free!

HOW DID YOU FIND OUT?

My husband was being silly and felt a lump. I went to the doctor and she sent me for a mammogram which was followed by an ultrasound. The ultrasound showed a spot in my right breast that resembled cancer which was followed by a biopsy that confirmed the diagnosis.

TELL US YOUR REACTION.

Initially, I cried when I was told at the ultrasound that it looked like cancer, but when I received the biopsy results I just asked what was next. I didn’t think much about my future. That was a time that I lived in the present and just focused on getting rid of the cancer and moving on with my life.

WHAT WAS YOUR TREATMENT PLAN?

My cancer was fed by Estrogen, Progesterone, and a protein called Her2-neu. I had a bilateral mastectomy (the left side was prophylactic), followed by chemotherapy which was paired with a drug called Herceptin (that targets the Her2-neu), followed by radiation, and then a drug called Tamoxifen (keeps the cancer from feeding off of my hormones).

I was supposed to be on the Tamoxifen for 5 years, but took a break to start a family.

HOW HAS TREATMENT AFFECTED YOUR WELL-BEING, IF AT ALL?

Treatment only temporarily affected my well-being. Any issues I had cleared up shortly after treatment was completed. I am very lucky and grateful for that.

HAS HAVING BREAST CANCER INSPIRED YOU TO DO SOMETHING GREATER WITH YOUR LIFE?

Breast cancer has inspired me to live my life. I enjoy life more and stress less. I am accomplishing what I have always wanted to accomplish. I fulfilled my dream of being a mother. I’m not focusing on what the future could bring. I am making my future what I want it to be.

SHARE YOUR BIGGEST STRUGGLES AND HOW DO YOU MANAGE THOSE?

My biggest struggle was accepting the fact that treatment could have made me infertile. I was really upset at first, but then told myself that if I didn’t go through treatment then I may not live to have children. I convinced myself that I needed to do everything I could do to ensure that I would be here for my future children and if having those future children is not possible then I would just cross that bridge when I came to it. I convinced myself to live in the moment.

FROM YOUR EXPERIENCE, WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR OTHERS WHO HAVE BEEN DIAGNOSED?

The best tip I could give to any woman out there is to do your self exams and (if you are old enough) get your mammograms on time. Breast cancer can grow fast. I went to the doctor in March 2009 and had a breast exam done. August 2009 we found a 1.8 cm tumor in my breast. It grew that much in less than 6 months.

Cancer doesn’t care about your age, gender, race, religion, family history, etc. It does not discriminate. It can choose anyone. You want to catch it early if it happens to happen to you.

Breast Cancer Survivor, Kristy Davis, shares her best advice for young women.

Photo Source
“Silky Robe” by wsilver is licensed under CC BY 2.0 / Text added to original
Personal photo courtesy of Kristy Davis

Comments

  1. Hi Wendy! Hi Kristy! Thank you so much for sharing your beautiful story. I too, am a “young” survivor and know how important self exams and early detection both are. Thank you for sharing and helping others take care of their health. Best wishes and blessings to you for continued good health. Hugs from your warrior sister, Holly

  2. Mary Killian says:

    Best wishes to you for continued good health. My story is similar to yours (Wendy published my story last October.) I am 22 years without disease and was diagnosed at age 30, nine months after giving birth to my first son. Unfortunately, I was Stage IV, and my treatment rendered me infertile. We went on to adopt our second son, now 14. I’m so blessed to have remained healthy to see my boys grow up!

  3. Thank you for sharing your story Kristy! Your strength and determination to “do what you had to do” is merely a part of what makes you an inspiration. How exciting to be expecting your new little one! Best wishes to you!

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